Tag Archives: mentor

MAP Mentor Training

What: MAP Mentor Training

When: April 4, 10:00 – 2:00

Where: Lake Washington UMC

RSVP: Rev. Terri Stewart (email link) or 425.531.1756

MAP is intended to be a service in addition to the chaplaincy, mentorship, counseling and probationary resources currently available to the youth housed in the King County Youth Detention Center and potentially Echo Glen Children’s Center. MAP was developed as a re-entry planning program which emphasizes autonomy, empowerment, goal setting, and safety planning through a consistent one-on-one mentorship relationship.

Mission

MAP elicits the wisdom of incarcerated youth by creating a process that allows them to access both internal and external resources and assist them in the creation of their own re-entry action plan.

Method

Mentors will meet at least five times over a period of one month or longer to identify and discuss obstacles and solutions to re-entry. This may include discussions about emotions, patterns of behaviors, life goals, and applicable community resources.

“Mappers”

Mappers are eligible incarcerated youth who may benefit from additional mentoring while incarcerated. Currently there are limited resources available that connect incarcerated youth with community resources on the “outs”. MAP was created to provide consistent mentoring while youth are incarcerated in order to ease the re-entry process by helping to identify progressive changes and possible community resources.

“MAP Mentors”

MAP Mentors will work with incarcerated Mappers to develop a MAP, or “Action Plan,” that can be used as an additional resource and form of support after release. The plan will address specific needs unique to each youth and will be compiled and presented to the youth during the final meeting. This binder will include resources, action-steps, and summaries of what was discussed throughout mentorship. A “MAP” may also provide a forum through which youth can express and act upon their own wants and personal goals as they relate to community needs and productive roles in society.

Goals

  • Provide long-term consistency in re-entry planning that will strengthen the Mapper’s commitment to future success, execution of goals, and safety planning.
  • Take an approach of accountability and empowerment, allowing each Mapper to be responsible for reaching his or her own milestones agreed upon during the Mapping process.
  • Increase self-esteem, autonomy, self-respect, and self-actualization, decrease destructive behavior patterns and recidivism, and encourage youth to make small achievements toward larger, long-term goals.
  • Create a tangible “MAP” or “Action Plan” that youth can take with them upon release. Youth will have co-created this MAP with their mentors and can refer to it for resources, inspiration, or self reflection.

MAP Flyer

Creating Healing Congregations Training

Creating Healing Communities: Walking with those affected by Incarceration

The Youth Chaplaincy Coalition, a task force of the Church Council of Greater Seattle, invites you to “Creating Healing Communities: Walking with those affected by incarceration” on Saturday, March 14 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. at First AME Church, 1522 14th Ave., Seattle 98122.

Healing Community congregations will build teams with other congregations in Washington and work to build an effective and powerful movement to change the criminal justice system at both the state and federal level.

Come hear how to bring awareness to your congregation about the issues of incarceration and recovery, reducing the sense of stigma and shame. Learn how to connect with those currently incarcerated, and how to provide support through support groups and pastoral counseling for the family and mentoring for returning citizens. Connect your congregation with community resources to better serve returning citizens.

Register and RSVP to the Rev. Terri Stewart, YCC-Chaplain@thechurchcouncil.org or 425.531.1756.

Healing Communities Flyer (PDF)

healingcommunities

Groundbreaking and Celebration!

Mentors in Mission Logo                         Join us!

Community Garden Groundbreaking Ceremony
Saturday, March 29th 9:00 am-3pm

..

Rainier Beach United Methodist Church
5500 South Roxbury Street

Come plant seeds to support our youth. 

RSVP on Facebook

The Youth Chaplaincy Coalition is a group of like- minded individuals and churches that seek to provide services, in a faith-based context, to youth affected by incarceration.  We are launching our new Mentors in Mission program  in partnership with Rainier Beach UMC which is designed to bring local mentors together with youth around gardening and mentoring.

Active Listening Methods

flickr photo by Wes Peck cc licensed (BYNC ND )
flickr photo by Wes Peck
cc licensed (BY NC ND )

Active listening is:

  • Hearing what the person says
  • Identifying and labeling the feelings a speaker experiences
  • Listening for undercurrent feelings not explicitly expressed by the speaker
  • Recognizing personal values and personal history revealed in conversation
  • Being empathetic, not sympathetic. Truly try to understand how the other person might be feeling without being judgmental. Your youth doesn’t want pity, but does want to feel like you understand, even if you can’t specifically relate the situation to your own life.

Some verbal response techniques for active listening include:

  • Paraphrases: Restatements of the speaker’s feeling or meaning in your own words. Paraphrases help against miscommunication and can clarify feelings.
    • “So, what I’m hearing you say is the security guard accused you of stealing the shirt, and called you a liar when you said it was paid for.”
  • Feeling reflections: Statements that focus on the emotions or feelings you observe in the speaker. This validates emotions.
    • “It sounds like you were angry when the guard accused you of stealing the shirt.”
  • Clarifications: Questions or comments to elicit more information from the speaker and to double-check your and the speaker’s understanding of the problem.
    • “And you said this happened yesterday?”
  • Neutral statements: Brief verbal responses that show the speaker that you are following the conversation.
    • “Mmhm. Gotcha. Then what?”
  • Summaries: Organizing statements that capture the speaker’s emotions and concerns concisely. A summary helps integrate the information you’ve heard, leads to new directions in conversation, and helps wrap up a listening session.
    • “Let me see if I understand you correctly. You feel thios situation is unfair and your first reaction was to get angry.”

Some non-verbal queues in active listening include:

  • Look the person in the eye. Good eye contact shows that you are paying attention and take the conversation seriously. Watching the speaker also lets you read thje speaker’s body language, which may say a lot about how she feels.
  • Use natural posture. Be relaxed. Slouching, resting your head on your hands or crossing your arms on your chest can signal boredom, fatigue, or restlessness.
  • Sit in a helping position. If you sit across from a person with a table in between, you may put yourself in an “oppositional” stance. Sit at an angle and lean slightly towards (but don’t crowd out!) your youth.

Adapted from the Work Group for Community Health and Development Community Tool Box, 2013. “Building Youth Mentor Relationships.” Available at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/implement/youth-mentoring/build-mentor-relationships/main