Category Archives: Uncategorized

Best Starts for Kids Program: In the Eyes of an Intern

I asked my intern, Londyn, to reflect on King County’s Best Starts for Kids program. Below is her reflection. Please note that she used information available at their website: http://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/community-human-services/initiatives/best-starts-for-kids.aspx .

 

“I found it absolutely incredible that Best Starts for Kids is not only leading the nation in this approach but also the annual dollar amount invested by them into King County families. This is so encouraging to know. I’ve always been taught that your check book is a reflection of your priority’s, and clearly this expresses how much KC values not only their community but the young as well.

This reminded me of what scripture says, “Train up a child in the way he should go, And when he is old he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6 NKJV). I admire their tactics, such as, investing early, maintaining the growth, valuing community and focusing on the results and data.

Although, these all go much deeper, they did a wonderful job of making their mission clear and their strategies evident. Boasting low juvenile detention numbers consistently compared to the demographic average. Through the use of alternative programs, equality of races and the reform of the juvenile justice system and practices they’re striving to eradicate disproportionalities of race within the system. Some alternatives mentioned on their site included, family intervention & restorative justice, creative justice, 180 programs, restorative mediation, step-up program and drug court.”

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Peacemaking Circle: Final Sentencing

The Peacemaking Coordinating Team and PointOneNorth Consulting LLC cordially invites you to:

PEACEMAKING CIRCLE CASE FINAL SENTENCING

FRIDAY, JULY 7

4-5PM

King County Juvenile Court, Lobby 1211 East Alder Seattle, WA 98122

Please join us and bear witness to our second case using the Peacemaking Circle Process as an alternative to the traditional punitive sentencing process.

This is the result of collaboration and partnership between families, communities, and the Justice system to address harm, heal, promote accountability, and build community. For more information please contact members of the Peacemaking Coordinating Team of King County at PCTteam@kingcountyPCT.org

PDF Flyer: 2017 07 07 Final Sentencing

2017 07 07 Final Sentencing

Bystander Training 

At Bystander Training, we discuss and learn:

  • Peacemaking process 
  • A shallow dive into intercultural development
  • Why people don’t intervene
  • Deescalation techniques
  • Witness guidelines 
  • Practice! (Bystander scenarios)
  • Honest conversation 

This is typically done in a four hour workshop that creates safe space and a healthy place to explore weighty issues of racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia. 

Contact Rev. Terri Stewart, 425.531.1756 or YCC-Chaplain@thechurchcouncil.org 


Honorarium and travel costs, please.

Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Youth.Chaplaincy.Coalition

Trauma and Youth

Some wise words from Dr. Nadine Burke Harris on trauma.

“Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. This unfolds across a lifetime, to the point where those who’ve experienced high levels of trauma are at triple the risk for heart disease and lung cancer. An impassioned plea for pediatric medicine to confront the prevention and treatment of trauma, head-on.” (From TED talk page)

There is a measurement for childhood trauma: the ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences). ACE measures the quantity of traumatic experiences of youth. A Florida study found that 50% of incarcerated youth have ACE scores of 4 events (or more). The general population is about 13%.

This means two things:

  • We must have trauma informed teaching with our vulnerable youth populations (ethnic, gender, and sexual minorities)
  • We must have trauma informed practices and buildings when we work with youth who have committed crimes

It is true, what we have been saying. These are not kids with a crime problem. They are kids with a trauma problem.